Building a brighter future for rural farming communities

  Photo by Paul Van Kan

Photo by Paul Van Kan

Khory Hancock, also known as the Environmental Cowboy, is a visionary. He’s working tirelessly with farmers affected by the current drought to help build a brighter future for them. Having grown up near Roma in Central Queensland, Khory recently found himself back in Outback Australia to film a documentary called ‘A Dry Hope’.

Annabelle: Khory you have built a really influential online presence and make great impact on social media. What inspired you to create the Environmental Cowboy as your alter ego? 

Khory: I was working in the western parts of New South Wales and Queensland carbon farming a few years back, and it got a bit lonely out there to be honest. So, after a few months of talking to the kangaroos and the emus, I decided I wanted to try and show people the work I was doing out there to hopefully inspire and educate the masses. The Environmental Cowboy image is just a way to cut through the often dry, hard science that people often don’t like listening to and helps to bring the messages in a more entertaining way. Also, I have fun doing it! Creating films and making people laugh with my occasional fails in life captured on camera makes me happy. The messages I bring are bigger than my own ego, I’m not doing it for fame or fortune. I feel like I’m making a difference by doing what I do, but I also love doing it, I feel alive by being able to give back in my own way to the people and world around me.

  Photo by Paul Van Kan

Photo by Paul Van Kan

Annabelle: You are filming a documentary called ‘A Dry Hope’. Could you please tell me about this and why you chose film as a medium to share your message of hope?

Khory: I recently went on a journey through New South Wales during this time of drought. I was inspired by people I met along the way like Derek and Kirrili from The Conscious Farmer and Eric Harvey who are striving to regenerate their land using holistic and regenerative farming practises. This film will include real life examples of how we can help to regenerate our land while helping to maintain agricultural productivity in a rapidly changing climate. One of the farmers I interviewed said, 'We need to think differently about how we use our land, and that requires a change in mindset'. I choose film as my primary platform because a good documentary can inspire thousands around the world and create the change we need to see a lot faster.

Annabelle: What is in store for the documentary, and where is the Environmental Cowboy heading?

Khory: We’re hoping the documentary is about to get signed to a large production company to distribute to channels like Discovery and National Geographic. I have a bit more filming to finish here in Australia then in Zimbabwe with Alan Savory at his Holistic Institute over there. It’s all very exciting and I have worked really hard behind the scenes to get it to this point. I’m currently looking for funding and financial partners to help finish it. Once it’s completed a few National Film Festivals have indicated they’ll broadcast it around Australia. I want to keep working as an Environmental science professional and I’d like to continue to build different businesses in film and seaweed farming to share important messages relating to the environment to large audiences. Ultimately, I’m aiming to produce a whole documentary series for National Geographic or Discovery channel on climate solutions.

To view the trailer for ‘A Dry Hope’, and also read more about the current projects Khory is involved with go to: www.khoryhancock.com

  Photo by Paul Van Kan

Photo by Paul Van Kan